The Relationship of Social Behavior with Suicidal Ideation

(A Textual Analysis of ‘Waking up Alive’ by Richard A. Heckler)

  • Muntazar Mehdi
  • Farwa Rauf
Keywords: Mental Illness, Suicide, Abuse, Trauma, Social Behavior, Waking up Alive

Abstract

This study highlights the social forces that galvanize and accelerate the risk for suicidal behaviors among social individuals. Suicidal behavior has traditionally been considered as a product of mental illness. In other words, a one-dimensional construct, with passive ideation, and active intent. The researchers conducted the textual analysis of non -fiction stories of 50 suicide attempts. The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between suicidal ideation and social behavior. The analysis shows that the external catastrophic events shape and reshape the memories and identities, which in turn, constitute internalized trauma. Hence, it is concluded that such traumatic experiences of these individuals affect their identities and memories, leading to the psychological states of thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensome resulting in desire for suicide and death. Hence, suicide can be deemed as a response to social behaviors like abuse, violence, and being an outcast.

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Published
2021-07-20